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Warrick AKA-89 - History

Warrick AKA-89 - History


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Warrick

(AKA-89: dp. 13,910 1. 473'1" b. 63'0", dr. 26'4" (lim.), s. 16.5 k., cpi. 366 a. 1 5", 8 40mm., 18 20mm. cl. Andromeda; T. C2-S-B1)

Warrick (AKA-89)—originally named Black Prince —was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1189) on 7 April 1944 at Oakland, Calif., by the Moore Dry Dock Co.; launched on 29 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. C. Wells Maren; and acquired and simultaneously commissioned by the Navy on 30 August 1944, at the Moore Dry Dock Company's west yard, Lt. Comdr. Ernest J. Grey, USNR, in command.

After loading stores at the Naval Supply Depot, Oakland, Warrick underwent a two week shakedown out of San Pedro, Calif., concluding that necessary period of familiarization and training on 25 September. She subsequently conducted practice landings at San Clemente Island before undergoing repairs and alterations between 13 and 20 October. Taking on cargo at Wilmington, Calif., on the 24th, Warrick departed the west coast at 1430 the following day, bound for Manus in the Admiralties.

The ship visited Manus; Hollandia, Finschhafen, and Langemak Bay, New Guinea, and Manus a second time before she returned to Hollandia to offload the 333 tons of general Army cargo. She then again shifted to Finschafen, arriving at 1635 on 1 December. There, she loaded 1,137 tons of Army equipment—mostly vehicles— and, on the day after Christmas, embarked 17 officers and 210 enlisted men (Army) at Langemak Bay. After fueling on the 27th, Warrick sailed for Manus, joined Tryon (APH-1) en route, and rendezvoused with Task Group (TG) 77.9 on the 28th.

Warrick stopped at Manus from 29 December 1944 to 2 January 1945, before getting underway on the latter day for Lingayen Gulf, on the northern coast of the island of Luzon, in the Philippines. En route, her convoy's escorts picked up three submarine contacts and depth charged them without obtaining results. No air attacks came the way of TG 77.9 fortunately, as American amphibious forces converged on Lingayen Gulf.

Warrick reached her destination at 0500 on 11 January and came to anchor at 0830. One hour later, she commenced offloading her cargo, some two days after the first of the Army troops under the overall command of General Douglas MacArthur had splashed ashore at Lingayen. Warrick continued her unloading of cargo over the next day. Landing craft, LCVP's and LCM's from Warren (APA-53) assisted in the unloading, continuing that task until 2200, when the operation ceased due to two factors: contact with her beach party had been lost and the beach itself was reportedly coming under shellfire.

After resuming the unloading on the 13th, Warrick completed her assigned duties by 1015. Taking the boats on board from 1040, Warrick got underway for Leyte Island, joining Task Unit (TU) 78.11.3 formed around Mt. McKinley (AGC-7) at 1746. She reached Leyte on the 16th.

The attack cargo ship took on board two LCVP's from the attack transport Oconto (APA-187) to replace boats which she had lost at Lingayen Gulf on the 17th. She departed the Philippines on the 19th, bound for the Carolines.

Reaching Ulithi on 23 January, Warrick fueled from Merrimack (AO-37) on 1 February, five days before she headed for the Marianas. Arriving at Guam on 8 February, the attack cargo ship began loading cargo and embarking troops two days later. Her load was a varied one: a transportation company, a tractor-trailer platoon, an engineer company, a war dog platoon, medical companies, ordnance repair units, replacement drafts of personnel, plus water, fuel, rations, and other supplies. With elements of the 3d Marine Division thus embarked, Warrick got underway for Iwo Jima on 17 February.

As part of TU 51.1.1, the attack cargo ship participated in the Iwo Jima assault as part of TG 51.1, the Joint Expeditionary Force Reserve. Screened by four destroyers and two destroyer escorts, Warrick sailed for that soon-to-be-famous island in company with Transport Divisions 31 and 33. She arrived at point "Equity" on the 19th and, during ensuing days, cruised in operating area "Porch" in keeping with her reserve status. She moved in closer to Iwo Jima on the 22d, but was still lying to, awaiting orders, on the following day. The attack cargo ship finally commenced unloading operations on the 24th in the transport area four miles off the southeastern coast of Iwo Jima.

Warrick hoisted out her boats at 0750 and commenced lowering them soon thereafter. She dispatched all of her LCM's to assist in the unloading of nearby attack transports. She soon learned over the voice radio, however, that the smaller LCVP's were showing a tendency to broach and break up on the steep beaches. Beachmasters were accordingly waving off the LCVP's so that the beaches would not become fouled with the wrecks of numerous landing craft, thus impeding the flow of supplies necessary to keep the marines advancing against the stubborn Japanese defenders. Thus, with no lighterage, Warrick did not start unloading her own cargo until the following day.

After returning from the night retirement area, the attack cargo ship hoisted out her boats at 0810 on the 25th. At that time, Warrick was noting that a strong sea was running with moderate to heavy swells, which in connection with a good breeze, made unloading conditions decidedly unfavorable. LST-731 came alongside at 1246 but, on her attempt, carried away two debarkation ladders and stove in some of Warrick's hull plating at two spots on her starboard side. At 1315, on her second attempt, LST-731 secured alongside and commenced taking on cargo.

Over the next two days, beach conditions remained the same, with the small landing craft suffering considerably in the heavy swells, leading to many bans on craft the size of LCM's and LCVP's being waived off from the beachhead. Accordingly, LST's and LSM's were utilized as lighters for the cargo. Over the next few days, the ship offloaded her cargo to LCT-692 and LST-7S1. On 2 March, Warrick dispatched three LCM's to help unload ammunition from SS Columbia Victory. She then completed discharging cargo in ensuing days to LSM-266 and LSM-238. In addition, she embarked 23 Marine casualties from the beach and later transferred them to Doyen (APA-1). On 6 March, after transferring smoke pots to LST-646, Warrick cleared Iwo Jima, bound for the Marianas.

Sailing from thence to the Solomon Islands, the attack cargo ship reached Tulagi on 18 March. For the remainder of hostilities, Warrick performed her vital but unglamourous support role. She transported boats from Guam and Manus to Florida Island and New Guinea, lifted Army cargo and troops from Noumea, New Caledonia, and New Guinea to Leyte, Cebu, and Manila, in the Philippines; and took return passengers to Manus. The end of hostilities in mid-August found the ship at Finschhafen, New Guinea.

Between the end of World War II in the Pacific and the onset of the Korean War—a time span of a little under five years—Warrick operated primarily in the western Pacific and in the Far East. Soon after the Japanese surrender, the attack cargo ship made two trips from the Philippines to Honshu, Japan, touching at the ports of Aomori, Sasebo, and Yokosuka, carrying men and materiel to support the occupation of the erstwhile enemy's homeland. She participated in Operation "Magic Carpet"—the return of discharged sailors, marines, airmen, and soldiers to the United States—and later supported the occupation of China and Korea visiting ports that ranged from Tsingtao to Hong Kong; and Shanghai to Sasebo. In addition, during those "interwar" years, the attack cargo ship lifted cargo to such places as Johnston Island, Tarawa, Ponape, and Kwajalein. Besides performing her vital logistics functions, the ship also took part in exercises with the Fleet.

When elements of the North Korean People's Army crossed the 38th parallel into South Korean territory at 0400 on 26 June 1950, they triggered the Korean War. At that time, Warrick was in port at San Francisco. She sailed for the Marshalls on 1 July and made port at Eniwetok on the 14th. She subsequently returned, via Pearl Harbor, to the west coast of the United States on 8 August. On 16 July, while deployed to the western Pacific, she received orders to berth at the Naval Supply Center, Oakland, to load as fleet issue ship for the western Pacific.

Moored at the supply center from 10 to 24 August, Warrick loaded balanced dry provisions sufficient for 20,000 men for 90 days; ships' store stock, clothing and small stores, general stores material, and a deck load of bottled gasses. When the task was complete, she sailed for the Far East, leaving San Francisco behind on 24 August.

Diverted to Sasebo, Japan, en route, Warrick arrived at that port on 9 September and, from 10 to 23 September, carried out duties of fleet issue supply ship. Attached to TF 79 on 11 September, the attack cargo ship sailed for the newly secured port of Inchon, North Korea, on 23 September, less than 10 days after American amphibious forces had attacked that port.

After performing her stores issue duties at Inchon from 25 September to 1 October, the attack cargo ship got underway to replenish ships of TF 77. Making contact with the fast carrier task force built around the carrier Valley Forge (CV-45), Warrick received the flattop alongside at 1143 on 2 October and commenced transferring cargo 12 minutes later. After delivering fleet freight, mail, napalm and drop tanks, Warrick set course to rendezvous with other men-of-war in the operating area off Korea's western coast.

After issuing stores to the veteran destroyer Fletcher (DDE-445) from 2335 on 2 October to 0040 on the 3d Warrick set a return course for Sasebo and arrived at that port on 4 October. She carried out her duties as stores issue ship there from 5 to 8 October before returning to Inchon to provide round-the-clock replenishment services to the ships of TF 90 from 11 to 14 October. "For performing an efficient job under adverse conditions," Warrick's commander wrote later, "Warrick received a 'well done.'"

Returning once more to Sasebo, the busy supply ship then proceeded to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where she arrived on the 24th. She replenished stores of the seaplane tender Salisburg Sound (AV-17) before getting underway for Keelung, Formosa, on the 25th. Shifting to the Pescadores on the 28th, she arrived on the 29th to replenish the small seaplane tender Floyds Bay (AVP-40) at Shochi Wan anchorage. Underway for Okinawa at 1326 on 29 October, the ship received radio reports en route of the progress of typhoon "Ruby." Warned of the critical area, the attack cargo ship remained in the Formosa Strait into the early hours of the 30th, trying to ascertain the progress of the storm. When she had accurately plotted the typhoon's course— revealing her to be apparently out of danger—the ship resumed her voyage to her original destination.

Taking on board cargo at Buckner Bay, Warrick returned to Sasebo, making port on 3 November. She unloaded the cargo lifted from Okinawa and discharged the remnants of her fleet issue stores at Sasebo before she got underway on 16 November, bound, once more, for the west coast of the United States.

There was little rest for Warrick, however. No sooner had she reached home than she received orders to prepare for yet another Korean deployment. She accordingly loaded provisions, clothing and small stores; ship store items, general stores, and consigned cargo between 3 and 23 December and embarked 135 Army and Air Force personnel for transportation to Sasebo. Departing San Francisco two days before Christmas 1950, Warrick reached Sasebo on 9 January 1951, mooring alongside Pollux (AKS-4) upon arrival.

Warrick remained at Sasebo, performing her duties as fleet issue ship, into mid February. After taking on board approximately 800 tons of empty brass shell casings for shipment back to the United States, and unloading her dry provisions and clothing stores at Yokosuka from 16 to 18 February, Warrick sailed for the United States on 19 February.

Over the next four years, Warrick's routine changed little. She operated in the western Pacific in regular deployments, carrying fleet freight, and touched at the familiar ports such as Sasebo and Yokosuka, as well as Hong Kong and Manila. In between, there were the usual stops at Pearl Harbor and San Francisco in the course of the ship's transpacific voyages.

After having spent her entire active career with the Pacific Fleet, Warrick commenced her last cruise to the Orient when she departed San Francisco on 28 January 1957. Her itinerary on the voyage included Yokosuka, Hong Kong, Sasebo, and Subic Bay, before she returned to San Francisco on 30 March. Placed in reserve at Astoria, Oreg., on 4 August 1957, the workhorse cargo ship was decommissioned on 3 December 1957.

Struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1961, Warrick was transferred to the Maritime Administration (MarAd) for lay-up at the MarAd reserve site at Olympia Wash. Reacquired by the Navy on 20 April 1971 for use as a target to destruction, the ship was torpedoed and sunk by Trigger (SS-564) 100 miles off Cape Flattery, Wash., in 1400 fathoms of water, on 28 May 1971.

Warrick ( AEA-89) received two battle stars for her World War II service and one for Korea.


Warrick AKA-89 - History

According to www.usmm.org/battle-a-f.html, U.S. Merchant Marine Ships whose Naval Armed Guard crews earned &ldquoBattle Stars&rdquo in WWII included the Columbia Victory for the following:

25 Feb &ndash 6 March 1945 Assault-Occupation of Iwo Jima

27 May &ndash 4 June 1945 Assault-Occupation of Okinawa Gunto

At http://en.wikipedia.org/wike/main_Page, you can find the WSS Warrick AKA-89, which states that on 2 March 1945, Warrick dispatched three LCM.s to help unload ammunition from SS Columbia Victory.

At http://ftp.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/IV/USMC-IV-VI-8.html. you will find a lengthy publication entitled Western Pacific Operations, History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II by Garand.Strowbridge, Historical Branch.G-3 Division.Headquarters.U.S. Marine Corps. At pages 602-603, you will find this about the Columbia Victory:

&ldquoThe Japanese, increasingly compelled to watch the beehive of activity along the eastern shore in helpless frustration, saw an opportunity to interfere with operations on the western beaches. On 1 March, an ammunition resupply ship, the Columbia Victory, was approaching the west coast with a cargo of artillery ammunition when mortar fire from Kama and Kangoku Rocks, as well as northwestern Iwo , bracketed the vessel. One shell exploded so close to the ship that it wounded one man and caused light damage to the vessel. Anxious eyes were watching the Japanese artillery fire, including those of Generals Holland Smith and Schmidt, who viewed the action from VAC headquarters on the west beach. More than the loss of a ship was involved. If the Columbia Victory&rsquos cargo of ammunition blew up, the entire west coast of Iwo could go with it, along with thousands of Marines working on the beaches. Keenly aware of the danger, the cargo ship reversed course and, miraculously evading additional near misses, headed back out to the open sea.&rdquo

We served on a very proud ship. Remember the Columbia Victory when you go to see Flag of our Fathers.


Warrick AKA-89 - History

(AKA-86: dp. 13,910 1. 459'2" b. 63'0'' dr. 26'4" (lim.) s. 16.5 k., cpl. 425, a. 1 5", 8 40mm., 1620mm. cl. Tolland T. C2-S-AJ3)

Woodford (AKA-89) was laid down under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1399) on 17 July 1944 at Wilmington, N.C., by the North Carolina
Shipbuilding Co. launched on 5 October 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Ruth E. McInnis, the wife of J. Frank McInnis who was in charge of the construction of all Maritime Commission ships built on the east coast, and placed in service on 19 October. The merchant tug Rescue towed Woodf ord to Hoboken, N.J., to be converted at the Todd Shipyard Corp. for Navy service. She was commissioned at the Todd Shipyard on 3 March 1945, Capt. Winston P. Folk in command.

After initial trials in Long Island Sound, shakedown in Chesapeake Bay, post shakedown availability at the Norfolk Navy Yard, further shakedown trials, and another availability, Woodf ord reported at the Naval Operating Base (NOB), Norfolk, on 19 April to take on her first cargo. When loaded, the attack cargo ship got underway on 28 April and headed for the Panama Canal, on the first leg of her voyage to the Pacific.

Woodford's passage, in company with her escort, the high-speed transport Runels (APD-85), was uneventful until early on 1 May, when Runnels made a sound contact. While her escort sought to develop the contact, the attack cargo ship went to general quarters and commenced evasive action. Later, both ships stood down from quarters when Runels lost the contact and could not regain it.

Woodford transited the isthmian waterway on 3 May and spent two days at Balboa before heading for Pearl Harbor in company with Runner (SS-476), Mora

y (SS 300), and Carp (SS-338). While en route, the ships conducted joint exercises, exchanging officers between the ships at various intervals to enable them to each observe the drills from a different perspective.

Also, while en route, the ships received the news that President Harry S. Truman had declared 8 May 1945 as "V-E Day," marking the victorious conclusion of the war with Germany. As Woodf ord's commanding officer recounted, "While the stirring news was received on board Woodford with joy, the joy was tinged with the thought that, after all, a terrific job lay ahead."

The attack cargo ship ultimately reached Pearl Harbor on 20 May where she discharged her cargo. A week later, she shifted to Honolulu where she took on a cargo tabbed as "high priority"—ammunition earmarked for the 10th Army at Okinawa. Once loaded Woodford set out independently for the Marshalls on 2 June but, en route, was rerouted to the Carolines.

Reaching Ulithi on 14 June, Woodford subsequently joined Convoy WOK-27 headed for Okinawa, but was again rerouted—this time to Kerama Retto, to await orders for discharge of her "high priority" cargo. For three weeks, from 24 June to 15 July, the attack cargo ship—her ammunition cargo still in her holds—lay in the roadstead of that group of small islands. During her stay, she went to general quarters 21 times because of alerts or actual enemy attacks an uncomfortable situation for a ship laden with ammunition.

Finally, orders came—but not to unload at either Okinawa or Kerama Retto. Instead, Woodford was directed to retire to the Marianas and unload at Guam. The attack cargo ship weighed anchor at Kerama Retto on 15 July and proceeded toward the Marianas with Convoy OKS-14. Reaching Saipan on the 21st, Woodf ord proceeded independently toward Guam one week later and anchored in Agana Bay on the 29th. There, transferring her ammunition into amphibious trucks (DUKW's), Woodford at long last discharged her dangerous cargo.

Upon completion of the unloading, the attack cargo ship immediately returned to Saipan to await further orders. There, at 0900 on 15 August, Woodford received word that the Japanese had capitulated. Pandemonium then reigned in the anchorage. Woodf ord's commanding officer recounted that "whistles and sirens sounded in blasts of raucous joy, drowning out the glad shouts that went up from thousands of men."

Two days after the capitulation, Woodford sailed for the Philippines and reached Leyte on the 20th. There, she joined Transport Squadron (TransRon) 13, Transport Division (TransDiv) 53. Shifting to Cebu soon thereafter, TransRon 13 loaded the men and equipment of the American Division—part of the force slated to occupy the erstwhile enemy's capital.

Woodford and her consorts subsequently sailed for Tokyo Bay, reaching that body of water on 8 September 1945—six days after the formal Japanese surrender ceremony on board the battleship Missouri (BB-62). The attack cargo ship disembarked her troops and discharged her cargo before she returned to the Philippines with TransDiv 53. Upon arriving back at Leyte on 16 September, the ship detached her first group of homeward-bound sailors eligible for discharges before getting underway to proceed independently to Cebu to commence taking on board troops before the arrival of the rest of TransDiv 53.

Combat-loaded with the men and equipment of the Army's 77th Division, Woodford returned to Japanese waters with TransDiv 53 and carried those troops and their equipment to Otaru, on the island of Hokkaido arriving there on 5 October. Upon completion of that operation, she returned to the Philippines.

Woodford remained in the Far East into December. Between 27 October and 4 November, she lifted rear elements of the 3d Amphibious Corps—the 30th Construction Battalion ( SeaBees ) and the 32d Special Construction Battalion from San Pedro Bay—from San Pedro Bay, Leyte, to Taku, China, in company with TransDiv 37, before proceeding singly to Guam to discharge cargo. From there, on 4 December, she proceeded to Sasebo, on the island of Kyushu, Japan.

Steaming into Sasebo harbor on 8 December, the ship anchored there until the 10th, when she went alongside a dock. There, she embarked elements of the 5th Marine Division and their equipment to be transported to the west coast of the United States. The ship's departure from the Far East, however, was not without elements of a "Hollywood thriller." Intelligence officers had uncovered what they thought to be Japanese sabotage plans which had tabbed Woodf ord with destruction after midnight on 13 December. Taking no chances that the discovery was a hoax, Woodf ord accordingly doubled the watch, manned her guns and searchlights, and broke out carbines and Thompson submachine guns. As the ship's commanding officer later reported: "The cost of the all-night vigil was happily no more, however, then a loss of sleep for all hands, not a shot was fired nor a saboteur discovered."

At 1100 on 14 December, with a homeward-bound pennant at the staff, Woodford stood out to sea to begin the 6,047-mile passage to San Diego and she reached her destination on the last day of 1946. After discharging cargo and disembarking her passengers, the attack cargo ship underwent voyage repairs at San Francisco into February 1946 before she sailed for the east coast of the United States.

Making port at Norfolk, via the Panama Canal, on 25 February, Woodford shifted briefly to New York before she returned to Norfolk on 7 March to be inactivated in the 5th Naval District. Accordingly, on 1 May 1946, Woodf ord was decommissioned one week later, on 8 May, her name was struck from the Navy list on 10 May and she was returned to the War Shipping Administration (WSA) of the Maritime Commission.

The erstwhile attack cargo ship was acquired from the WSA by the A. H. Bull Steamship Co., of New York City, in 1947 and renamed Suzanne. Subsequently acquired by the Westmount Shipping Co., also of New York, and renamed Rappahannock, the ship performed general cargo-carrying services into 1973. Her name disappears from the Record of the American Bureau of Shipping in 1974.


Fourth Overall Pick of the 2000 NFL Draft

Mandatory Credit: M. David Leeds/ALLSPORT

The Cincinnati Bengals made Peter Warrick the fourth overall selection of the 2000 NFL Draft.

The Bengals hoped Warrick could exceed expectations in the pros and join the ranks of Cris Collinsworth, Isaac Curtis, and Carl Pickens as the best wide receivers in franchise history.

Cincinnati was coming off a disastrous 4-12 win-loss 1999 season.

The Bengals also missed the postseason for a ninth consecutive year.

Cincinnati’s receiving corps was thin entering the 2000 NFL season.

The Bengals cut Pickens, let Willie Jackson become a free agent, and sidelined Darnay Scott for the entire season after he broke his leg during training camp.

The wideout depth chart wasn’t particularly impressive, either: Cincinnati’s healthy receivers included guys such as Danny Farmer, Craig Yeast, and Ron Dugans.

For these reasons, football fans from Southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky pinned their hopes on the electrifying Warrick.

Warrick put up some decent numbers during his rookie season, catching 51 passes for 592 yards and four touchdowns.

The Bengals continued to struggle as they duplicated their dreadful 4-12 win-loss record.

Warrick wasn’t much better during his sophomore campaign.

While he had slightly more receptions (70) and receiving yards (667), he only had one touchdown catch all season long. At 6-10, Cincinnati continued it’s losing ways in 2001.

The third-year pro reversed his statistical trend in the 2002 NFL season.

He caught more touchdown passes (six) while recording fewer receiving yards (606) and receptions (53) from a year ago.

Ultimately, it didn’t matter much as the Bengals reached rock bottom, winning just two of their 16 games in 2002.

All of a sudden, things started to look up for Warrick and Co. a season later.

Warrick upped the ante during the 2003 NFL season and flourished as a slot receiver.

He recorded career highs in receptions (79), receiving yards (819), and touchdowns (seven).

His most memorable game was against the 9-0 Kansas City Chiefs on November 16, 2003.

Arguably the signature moment of his NFL career was his 68-yard punt return for a touchdown.

Several plays later, Warrick caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Jon Kitna to secure the Bengals’ 24-19 upset win over the Chiefs.

11-16-2003, the Bengals beat the Chiefs 24-19. @Pdub80 Peter Warrick had a 68 yard punt return touchdown & caught a 77 yard touchdown from @CoachJKit. Rudi Johnson ran for 165 yards on 22 carries. pic.twitter.com/L2xTocunRK

&mdash Scott F (@TheFrizz87) November 17, 2020

Warrick’s breakout campaign helped the Bengals win eight games in 2003.

Despite the impressive turnaround, Cincinnati still missed the postseason.

Nonetheless, it was something the Bengals could build on the following year.

Warrick spoke with Bengals.com’s Geoff Hobson about his best pro season in 2003:

“I had a nice season. I just think it’s getting better every year. I told my family the fifth year is going to be the best year just because I know the system and what I have to do.”

“Weve got Coach Brat (offensive coordinator Bob Bratkowski) and I’ve been with him how many years now? Four? Now I can do things better with more experience, more knowing what I have to do.”

Just when Warrick’s fortunes on the field improved, they quickly took a turn for the worse.

Warrick cracked his shin bone during the season-opening 31-24 loss to the New York Jets on September 12, 2004.

“His injury has not healed in a way that he could play productively,” then-Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis told The Associated Press (via ESPN). “Our doctors all agree that the best course for Peter is to have surgery that will allow him to fully recover in plenty of time for 2005.”

Warrick played sparingly in the Bengals’ succeeding games.

The team eventually decided to shut him down for the rest of the season prior to the Week 7 game against the visiting Denver Broncos.

He never suited up in a Bengals jersey again.

Warrick’s injury solidified T.J. Houshmandzadeh’s status as Cincinnati’s No. 2 wide receiver behind Pro Bowler Chad Johnson.

Without Warrick in tow, the Bengals duplicated their 8-8 win-loss record from 2003, missing the postseason yet again.

Since the Bengals had a logjam at the wide receiver spot, there were rumors Warrick requested for his release.

The team reluctantly agreed to his wishes.

“There is some disappointment involved in making this move,” Lewis said in a team statement. “But I believe it’s in the best interest of the Bengals and Peter to go forward.”

However, Warrick cleared the air in an interview with The Bradenton Times’ Dennis Maley in March 2012.

Warrick said he heard rumors about his impending release when he sat out nearly the entire 2004 NFL season.

Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis assured him no such thing will happen.

The Bengals cut Warrick the next day.

“I felt really disrespected by the way that was handled. I gave everything I had to Cincinnati, and I just felt they owed it to me to tell me like a man.”

“Not hearing it everywhere else first, and then just asking not to be humiliated if that was the case. Let me know before I walk in there, you know, men have pride.”

“That’s when I understood that this is just a business and they’re not looking out for anything but their bottom line. There’s no family, no loyalty, it’s just a money thing.”

Fortunately, Warrick didn’t have to wait long to find another team.

The Seattle Seahawks signed Warrick to a one-year deal worth $1.4 million just days before the start of the 2005 NFL season, per ESPN.

Seattle expected Warrick to contend for the No. 3 receiver role behind starters Bobby Engram and Darrell Jackson.

He never lived up to the hype, finishing the season with just 180 receiving yards on 11 catches.

Warrick took the field for Super Bowl XL, finishing with 27 punt return yards in the Seahawks’ 21-10 loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Seattle eventually released Warrick after the preseason seven months later.

In the end, some Bengals lifers regret their team passing up on prolific running back Jamal Lewis, whom the Baltimore Ravens selected right after Warrick in the 2000 NFL Draft.

Cincinnati also passed up on Plaxico Burress, Thomas Jones, Corey Simon, and Brian Urlacher, who were all drafted after Warrick and had far more productive NFL careers.

To sum up Peter Warrick’s career in the NFL, it was nowhere as productive as his days at Florida State.

Warrick’s electrifying play in college fizzled out sooner than expected at the pro level.

While he showed occasional flashes of brilliance, it was clear from the outset he wasn’t the franchise wide receiver the Cincinnati Bengals envisioned him to become.


یواس‌اس واریک (ای‌کی‌ای-۸۹)

یواس‌اس واریک (ای‌کی‌ای-۸۹) (به انگلیسی: USS Warrick (AKA-89) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۴۵۹ فوت ۱ اینچ (۱۳۹٫۹۳ متر) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۴ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس واریک (ای‌کی‌ای-۸۹)
USS Warrick (AKA-89)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۷ آوریل ۱۹۴۴
آغاز کار: ۲۹ مه ۱۹۴۴
اعزام: ۳۰ اوت ۱۹۴۴
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: ۱۳٬۹۱۰ long ton (۱۴٬۱۳۳ تن)
درازا: ۴۵۹ فوت ۱ اینچ (۱۳۹٫۹۳ متر)
پهنا: ۶۳ فوت (۱۹ متر)
آبخور: ۲۶ فوت ۴ اینچ (۸٫۰۳ متر)
سرعت: ۱۶٫۵ گره (۳۰٫۶ کیلومتر بر ساعت؛ ۱۹٫۰ مایل بر ساعت)

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Contents

World War II, 1944–1945

After loading stores at the Naval Supply Depot, Oakland, Warrick underwent a two-week shakedown out of San Pedro, California, concluding that necessary period of familiarization and training on 25 September. She subsequently conducted practice landings at San Clemente Island before undergoing repairs and alterations between 13 and 20 October. Taking on cargo at Wilmington, California, on the 24th, Warrick departed the west coast at 1430 the following day, bound for Manus in the Admiralties.

The ship visited Manus, Hollandia, Finschhafen, and Langemak Bay, New Guinea and Manus a second time before she returned to Hollandia to offload the 333 tons of general Army cargo. She then again shifted to Finschhafen, arriving at 1635 on 1 December. There, she loaded 1,137 tons of Army equipment — mostly vehicles — and, on the day after Christmas, embarked 17 officers and 210 enlisted men (Army) at Langemak Bay. After fueling on the 27th, Warrick sailed for Manus, joined Tryon (APH-1) en route, and rendezvoused with Task Group (TG) 77.9 on the 28th.

Warrick stopped at Manus from 29 December 1944 to 2 January 1945, before getting underway on the latter day for Lingayen Gulf, on the northern coast of the island of Luzon, in the Philippines. En route, her convoy's escorts picked up three submarine contacts and depth charged them without obtaining results. No air attacks came the way of TG 77.9, fortunately, as American amphibious forces converged on Lingayen Gulf.

Warrick reached her destination at 0500 on 11 January and came to anchor at 0830. One hour later, she commenced offloading her cargo, some two days after the first of the Army troops under the overall command of General Douglas MacArthur had splashed ashore at Lingayen. Warrick continued her unloading of cargo over the next day. Landing craft, LCVP's and LCM's, from Warren (APA-53) assisted in the unloading, continuing that task until 2200, when the operation ceased due to two factors: contact with her beach party had been lost and the beach itself was reportedly coming under shellfire.

After resuming the unloading on the 13th, Warrick completed her assigned duties by 1015. Taking the boats on board from 1040, Warrick got underway for Leyte Island, joining Task Unit (TU) 78.11.3 formed around Mount McKinley (AGC-7) at 1745. She reached Leyte on the 16th.

The attack cargo ship took on board two LCVP's from the attack transport Oconto (APA-187) to replace boats which she had lost at Lingayen Gulf on the 17th. She departed the Philippines on the 19th, bound for the Carolines.

Reaching Ulithi on 23 January, Warrick fueled from Merrimack (AO-37) on 1 February, five days before she headed for the Marianas. Arriving at Guam on 8 February, the attack cargo ship began loading cargo and embarking troops two days later. Her load was a varied one: a transportation company, a tractor-trailer platoon, an engineer company, a war dog platoon, medical companies, ordnance repair units, replacement drafts of personnel, plus water, fuel, rations, and other supplies. With elements of the 3rd Marine Division thus embarked, Warrick got underway for Iwo Jima on 17 February.

As part of TU 51.1.1, the attack cargo ship participated in the Iwo Jima assault as part of TG 51.1, the Joint Expeditionary Force Reserve. Screened by four destroyers and two destroyer escorts, Warrick sailed for that soon-to-be-famous island in company with Transport Divisions 31 and 33. She arrived at point "Equity" on the 19th and, during ensuing days, cruised in operating area "Porch" in keeping with her reserve status. She moved in closer to Iwo Jima on the 22nd, but was still lying to, awaiting orders, on the following day. The attack cargo ship finally commenced unloading operations on the 24th in the transport area four miles off the southeastern coast of Iwo Jima.

Warrick hoisted out her boats at 0750 and commenced lowering them soon thereafter. She dispatched all of her LCM's to assist in the unloading of nearby attack transports. She soon learned over the voice radio, however, that the smaller LCVP's were showing a tendency to broach and break up on the steep beaches. Beach-masters were accordingly waving off the LCVP's so that the beaches would not become fouled with the wrecks of numerous landing craft, thus impeding the flow of supplies necessary to keep the marines advancing against the stubborn Japanese defenders. Thus, with no lighterage, Warrick did not start unloading her own cargo until the following day.

After returning from the night retirement area, the attack cargo ship hoisted out her boats at 0810 on the 25th. At that time, Warrick was noting that a strong sea was running with moderate to heavy swells, which, in connection with a good breeze, made unloading conditions decidedly unfavorable. LST-731 came alongside at 1245 but, on her attempt, carried away two debarkation ladders and stove in some of Warrick's hull plating at two spots on her starboard side. At 1315, on her second attempt, LST-731 secured alongside and commenced taking on cargo.

Over the next two days, beach conditions remained the same, with the small landing craft suffering considerably in the heavy swells, leading to many bans on craft the size of LCM's and LCVP's being waived off from the beachhead. Accordingly, LST's and LSM's were utilized as lighters for the cargo. Over the next few days, the ship offloaded her cargo to LCT-692 and LST-731. On 2 March, Warrick dispatched three LCM's to help unload ammunition from SS Columbia Victory. She then completed discharging cargo in ensuing days to LSM-266 and LSM-238. In addition, she embarked 23 Marine casualties from the beach and later transferred them to Doyen (APA-1). On 6 March, after transferring smoke pots to LST-646, Warrick cleared Iwo Jima, bound for the Marianas.

Sailing from thence to the Solomon Islands, the attack cargo ship reached Tulagi on 18 March. For the remainder of hostilities, Warrick performed her vital but unglamourous support role. She transported boats from Guam and Manus to Florida Island and New Guinea lifted Army cargo and troops from Nouméa, New Caledonia, and New Guinea to Leyte, Cebu, and Manila, in the Philippines and took return passengers to Manus. The end of hostilities in mid-August found the ship at Finschhafen, New Guinea.

Inter-war years, 1945–1950

Between the end of World War II in the Pacific and the onset of the Korean War — a time span of a little under five years — Warrick operated primarily in the western Pacific and in the Far East. Soon after the Japanese surrender, the attack cargo ship made two trips from the Philippines to Honshū, Japan, touching at the ports of Aomori, Sasebo, and Yokosuka, carrying men and materiel to support the occupation of the erstwhile enemy's homeland. She participated in "Operation Magic Carpet" — the return of discharged sailors, marines, airmen, and soldiers to the United States — and later supported the occupation of China and Korea, visiting ports that ranged from Tsingtao to Hong Kong and Shanghai to Sasebo. In addition, during those "interwar" years, the attack cargo ship lifted cargo to such places as Johnston Island, Tarawa, Ponape, and Kwajalein. Besides performing her vital logistics functions, the ship also took part in exercises with the Fleet.

Korea and the Pacific Fleet, 1950–1957

When elements of the North Korean People's Army crossed the 38th parallel into South Korean territory at 0400 on 25 June 1950, they triggered the Korean War. At that time, Warrick was in port at San Francisco. She sailed for the Marshalls on 1 July and made port at Eniwetok on the 14th. She subsequently returned, via Pearl Harbor, to the west coast of the United States on 8 August. On 16 July, while deployed to the western Pacific, she received orders to berth at the Naval Supply Center, Oakland, to load as fleet issue ship for the western Pacific.

Moored at the supply center from 10 August to 24 August, Warrick loaded balanced dry provisions sufficient for 20,000 men for 90 days ships' store stock clothing and small stores general stores material and a deck load of bottled gases. When the task was complete, she sailed for the Far East, leaving San Francisco behind on 24 August.

Diverted to Sasebo, Japan, en route, Warrick arrived at that port on 9 September and, from 10 September to 23 September, carried out duties of fleet issue supply ship. Attached to TF 79 on 11 September, the attack cargo ship sailed for the newly secured port of Inchon, North Korea, on 23 September, less than 10 days after American amphibious forces had attacked that port.

After performing her stores issue duties at Inchon from 25 September to 1 October, the attack cargo ship got underway to replenish ships of TF 77. Making contact with the fast carrier task force built around the carrier Valley Forge (CV-45), Warrick received the flattop alongside at 1143 on 2 October and commenced transferring cargo 12 minutes later. After delivering fleet freight, mail, napalm and drop tanks, Warrick set course to rendezvous with other men-of-war in the operating area off Korea's western coast.

After issuing stores to the veteran destroyer Fletcher (DDE-445) from 2335 on 2 October to 0040 on the 3rd, Warrick set a return course for Sasebo and arrived at that port on 4 October. She carried out her duties as stores issue ship there from 5 October to 8 October before returning to Inchon to provide round-the-clock replenishment services to the ships of TF 90 from 11 October to 14 October. "For performing an efficient job under adverse conditions", Warrick's commander wrote later, "Warrick received a 'well done.' "

Returning once more to Sasebo, the busy supply ship then proceeded to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where she arrived on the 24th. She replenished stores of the seaplane tender Salisbury Sound (AV-13) before getting underway for Keelung, Formosa, on the 25th. Shifting to the Pescadores on the 28th, she arrived on the 29th to replenish the small seaplane tender Floyds Bay (AVP-40) at Shochi Wan anchorage. Underway for Okinawa at 1326 on 29 October, the ship received radio reports en route of the progress of typhoon "Ruby". Warned of the critical area, the attack cargo ship remained in the Formosa Strait into the early hours of the 30th, trying to ascertain the progress of the storm. When she had accurately plotted the typhoon's course — revealing her to be apparently out of danger — the ship resumed her voyage to her original destination.

Taking on board cargo at Buckner Bay, Warrick returned to Sasebo, making port on 3 November. She unloaded the cargo lifted from Okinawa and discharged the remnants of her fleet issue stores at Sasebo before she got underway on 16 November, bound, once more, for the west coast of the United States.

There was little rest for Warrick, however. No sooner had she reached home than she received orders to prepare for yet another Korean deployment. She accordingly loaded provisions, clothing and small stores ship store items general stores and consigned cargo between 3 December and 23 December and embarked 135 Army and Air Force personnel for transportation to Sasebo. Departing San Francisco two days before Christmas 1950, Warrick reached Sasebo on 9 January 1951, mooring alongside stores ship Pollux (AKS-4) upon arrival.

Warrick remained at Sasebo, performing her duties as fleet issue ship, into mid-February. After taking on board approximately 800 tons of empty brass shell casings for shipment back to the United States, and unloading her dry provisions and clothing stores at Yokosuka from 16 February to 18 February, Warrick sailed for the United States on 19 February.

Over the next four years, Warrick's routine changed little. She operated in the western Pacific in regular deployments, carrying fleet freight, and touched at the familiar ports such as Sasebo and Yokosuka, as well as Hong Kong and Manila. In between, there were the usual stops at Pearl Harbor and San Francisco in the course of the ship's transpacific voyages.

After having spent her entire active career with the Pacific Fleet, Warrick commenced her last cruise to the Orient when she departed San Francisco on 28 January 1957. Her itinerary on the voyage included Yokosuka, Hong Kong, Sasebo, and Subic Bay, before she returned to San Francisco on 30 March.

Decommissioning and disposal

Warrick was placed in reserve at Astoria, Oregon, on 4 August 1957, and the workhorse cargo ship was decommissioned on 3 December 1957. Struck from the Navy List on 1 July 1961, Warrick was transferred to the Maritime Administration for lay-up at the reserve site at Olympia, Washington. Reacquired by the Navy on 20 April 1971 for use as a target ship, the ship was torpedoed and sunk by attack submarine Trigger (SS-564) 100 miles off Cape Flattery, Washington, in 1400 fathoms of water, on 28 May 1971.


Meta Warrick Fuller: Trailblazing African American Sculptor and Poet

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller (1877-1968), born to a black middle class family in Philadelphia, attended the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Arts in 1897, and moved to Paris in 1899 to study sculpture for three years. There, she met French sculptor Auguste Rodin who was impressed by her powerful work, and she became known as the “sculptor of horrors” for her dark, expressive artistic renderings. When she returned to the U.S., Warrick was commissioned by W.E.B. DuBois to create art for several world fairs that would represent African American history and contributions to the country. Despite opposition from her husband and ostracism from the U.S. art scene, Fuller created revolutionary sculptures throughout the 1910s and 1920s that elevated the African American experience as a subject worthy of depiction in art. Anticipating themes of the Harlem Renaissance, her work sought to celebrate African heritage and African American cultural identity. Late in her career, in the 1960s, she wrote poetry and created sculptural tributes to the civil rights movement.

Interviewees: historian Renée Ater, Associate Professor Emerita, American Art, The University of Maryland and author of Remaking Race and History: The Sculpture of Meta Warrick Fuller sculptor Alison Saar, whose artwork focuses on the African diaspora and black female identity.

To learn more about Meta Warrick Fuller and access learning resources, visit PBSLearningMedia.

Meta Warrick Fuller was really an important artist, at a time where not many African American sculptors were telling their own stories. Meta's work is passionate, it's daring.

22-year old Meta Warrick Fuller arrived alone from the U.S. to attend art school.

She was restricted from access in the U.S. from predominantly all white academies. This is why she goes to Paris.

There are not a lot of African American women who are doing this in the late 19th, early 20th century.

It's arranged that she will go to the American Girls Club to find residence there. But she's denied the minute she shows up at the door.

'The director said, 'You didn't tell me that you were not a white girl!' I said, 'I was told that the Club was here for American girls who came to Paris to study - and I felt that I, as an American girl, was entitled to come.'' Warrick Fuller found her own apartment and enrolled in art school.

Meta was shocked to encounter American style racism in Paris.

But that defining moment forced her to become independent and to become more fully an artist.

Meta Warrick Fuller was born in 1877 to a middle class family in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Her father owned his own barber shop, and her mother was a hairdresser.

And they were able to provide her with activities that were fairly unusual for most black kids growing up in the United States- music and dance classes, art making classes.

'My father and I went to art exhibitions and together we lived in the pictures we saw, and the sculptures overwhelmed us.'

Fuller was very interested in work that can convey deep emotion and kind of the psychological interior.

Particularly as a teenager, she was interested in ghost stories and tales of horror.

'This was the food upon which my imagination thrived.'

Warrick Fuller was studying in Paris, when a world's fair opened in 1900.

World fairs were places that African Americans felt they could set the record straight about their education, their contributions to literature, to the arts, to music.

The organizers of the American Negro exhibit - including noted scholar W.E.B DuBois, one of the founders of the NAACP - invited Warrick Fuller to create displays celebrating black history.

She starts out as a young artist, and right away she makes this important connection with W.E.B DuBois.

He becomes someone who will promote her career. They assembled dioramas that were scenes of black life, and statistical information to prove the advancement of the black race.

In Paris, Warrick Fuller also met the country's leading sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

He takes her around his studios.

She sees his plaster casts of body parts and she is floored by this experience.

He is downright influential on her work- that interest in the interior life, but also in the artist's hand being present in the materials, is something she fully understands from Rodin.

'Rodin is the master of them all.

My heart went out and with clenched fists, I determined to fulfill my promise.'

Warrick Fuller's work was shown in three major exhibitions in Paris, including one at the students club, which rejected her three years prior.

She is the only American sculptor that is called out in the French press for her kind of amazing work.

And she's called 'the sculptor of horrors' because she is creating small scale objects that show the deepest, darkest emotions that we can have.

'My work is of the soul, rather than the figure, and sometimes the figure must be very crude in order to carry the full strength of the spiritual meaning.'

She's able to convey so much emotion and power in these figures, simply by a turn of the head or a tilt of the hip.

She's a real incredible and unique talent in that respect.

My name is Alison Saar, and I'm an artist.

I really enjoy the transformation of materials.

Such a huge part of sculpture is actually physically being able to experience it through touch. When I was growing up, it was pretty few and far between that we could see an exhibition of an artist of color, and more so of even women artists.

Being a sculptor and working with things like chainsaws and rusty tin definitely wouldn't have been considered ladylike then.

Sculpture has always been a man's world, all the schools I went to, all the sculpture teachers were male. It was very macho. So, it was a difficult trail to pursue.

Warrick Fuller returned to Philadelphia. Despite her success abroad, she was ostracized from the white male dominated art scene.

Once she walked into that gallery space as a black woman, the racism just was enacted almost immediately.

'There were many disappointments when I tried to sell work, but I resolved to work at all odds and continue to create.'

In 1907, Warrick Fuller became the first African American woman to receive a federal art commission, when DuBois invited her to mark the 300th anniversary of the Jamestown Virginia Settlement.

It was a very complicated situation.

African Americans were not allowed to attend during regular hours.

There would be what were called 'Negro days.' But she showed at this fair and won a prize for these dioramas about progress.

She's not resorting to those early 20th century images of the mammy or Uncle Tom. She's trying to offer an alternative vision about blackness.

'I was anxious to do the work because I loved it, and because it was an opening for me.'

She met Solomon Carter Fuller, the first person of African descent to practice psychiatry in the U.S. They married in 1909, set up a home in Framingham, Massachusetts, and had three sons.

Her husband wanted her to be a mother and a wife first.

He was not interested in her pursuing her art career full time.

She had to carve out a space in her attic where she continued to create.

Warrick Fuller later secretly built herself a studio near their home.

In 1910, a fire broke out in the warehouse where she stored her work.

Sixteen years of her art was destroyed.

Most of her work from Paris does not remain because it was destroyed in this fire. She must have been just heart sore at the loss of this collection.

'This morning I got up feeling so blue.

It is awful to feel you have power you cannot make use of.'

In 1913, Fuller was commissioned to create a sculpture for the 50th anniversary of the abolishment of slavery.

She creates a statue of two figures, a man and a woman.

They are semi nude, and they are not being liberated by Abraham Lincoln or a former owner.

She was radical during her time period for taking up the black body in sculpture.

My monument for Harriet Tubman in Harlem is probably the most prominent.

I have embedded in her skirt various objects that would belong to passengers on the underground railroad - what few things you could actually carry while trying to escape slavery. And then coming out of the back of her skirt are these roots, which symbolize her role in uprooting slavery.

I'm really interested in these strong African American female figures who have historically held up the world.

Warrick Fuller sculpted her most well known public work for a 1921 exhibit in New York.

She created this statue to represent the awakening of black people.

'Here was a Negro, gradually unwinding the bandage of its mummied past and looking out on life again, expectant but unafraid.'

As the health of her husband declined, he insisted she gave up her art career.

'I have given up everything to look after him.

I had hoped to leave behind work that would have meaning to the coming generation, but that is all over now.'

Despite her personal disappointments, Warrick Fuller was considered a forerunner of the Harlem Renaissance, an artistic and intellectual awakening among African Americans in the 1920s.

Meta becomes a model for other women sculptors - Augusta Savage, Nancy Elizabeth Prophet, are looking to Fuller as a model of a African American woman sculptor who had made it in the early part of the century.

After her husband's death, Warrick Fuller, now in her 70s, returned to making art intermittently. Writing poetry, often of a religious nature became her new passion.

'Wait reverently and have no fear.

The hand which fashioned you is gentle and will guide with loving care.'

Warrick Fuller died in 1968 at age 91.

Three decades later, 'Emancipation' was cast in bronze and installed as a public monument in Boston's Harriet Tubman Square.

I imagine myself and other women of color working in sculpture are all part of this legacy, starting with her, and it would be really nice to think that she's going to continue to influence other young female artists yet to come.

'The Negro possesses as much artistic ability as any other group of Americans.

Despite the many hindrances, much has been accomplished in which we may take pride.'



  • AKA-15 Andromeda ex AK-66
  • AKA-16 Aquarius
  • AKA-17 Centaurus
  • AKA-18 Cepheus
  • AKA/LKA-19 Thuban
  • AKA-20 Virgo Reclassified AE-30
  • AKA-53 Achernar
  • AKA/LKA-54 Algol
  • AKA-55 Alshain
  • AKA/LKA-56 Arneb
  • AKA-60 Leo
  • AKA/LKA-61 Muliphen
  • AKA-62 Sheliak
  • AKA-63 AKA-88 Uvalde
  • AKA-89 Warrick
  • AKA-90 Whiteside
  • AKA-91 Whitley
  • AKA-92 Wyandot Reclassified T-AK-283
  • AKA/LKA-93 Yancey
  • AKA/LKA-94 Winston
  • AKA-95 Marquette
  • AKA-96 Mathews
  • AKA/LKA-97 Merrick
  • AKA-98 Montaque
  • AKA-99 Rolette
  • AKA-100 Oglethorpe
  • AKA-101 Ottawa

The following web sites contain information on USMM ships of Skagit's type. Those of us who were crew always heard that when Skagit's hull was first laid, she was to become the Merchant Ship Alden Besse but I'm not sure this has ever been confirmed.

The Alden Besse was built by the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company at Wilmington, the same Company that built Skagit.

The Alden Besse, MC# 1360 (C2-S-AJ1) was delivered to the Maritime Commission in February 1944.

Skagit MC# 1696 (C2-S-AJ3) was delivered in November 1944, so the rumor that Skagit was to be the Alden Besse seems unlikely.

===============================

Andromeda or Tolland Class?

There has always been some disagreement between "Jane's Fighting Ships" and the "Dictionary Of American Fighting Ships" concerning Skagit's class.

We found that the later Tolland Class AKAs (C2-S-AJ3) hull numbers 101 thru 108 were built from the keel up as AKAs, whereas Skagit was a converted merchant ship (C2-S-B1) according to the "Dictionary Of American Fighting Ships".

According to the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company web site, Skagit was delivered as a (C2-S-AJ3) as was Union, Ottawa, Prentiss, Vermillion, Washburn, Rankin, and Seminole.

I don't think the (C2-S-AJ3) designation has anything to do with how the ship is fitted out, since there were merchant ships built on this hull.

Also according to the North Carolina Shipbuilding Company web site, they didn't build or finish any C2-S-B1 ships during 1944 and 1945.

So until more information is found, I guess the controversy will continue.


Alcoa’s Warrick Mill business sold to new company for $670 million

WARRICK CO., Ind. (WFIE) - Alcoa Corporation announced Monday an agreement to sell its rolling mill business, held by Alcoa Warrick LLC, to Kaiser Aluminum Corporation for total consideration of approximately $670 million, which includes $587 million in cash and the assumption of $83 million in other postretirement employee benefit (OPEB) liabilities.

The sale is expected to close by the end of the first quarter of 2021, pending regulatory approval and customary closing conditions.

The rolling mill is located at Warrick Operations, an integrated aluminum manufacturing site near Evansville, Indiana.

Alcoa will retain ownership of the site’s 269,000 metric ton per year aluminum smelter and its electric generating units.

Alcoa will also enter into a ground lease agreement with Kaiser for property that Alcoa will continue to own at the Warrick site.

Officials say the announcement is part of Alcoa’s strategy to generate between $500 million and $1 billion in cash through the sale of non-core assets and will put total cash proceeds in the target range.

Earlier this year, Alcoa announced the sale of its former waste treatment business in Gum Springs, Arkansas, and received $200 million in cash with an additional $50 million that will be paid if certain post-closing conditions are satisfied.

“The sale will achieve a key target in our strategy to focus on core markets while generating additional cash,” said Alcoa President and CEO Roy Harvey. “We look forward to having Kaiser Aluminum as a valued customer at Warrick Operations, and we thank all of the employees who have contributed significantly to the site’s 60-year history of manufacturing excellence.”

As part of the transaction, Alcoa will enter into a market-based metal supply agreement with Kaiser Aluminum at closing.

Alcoa will continue to operate the smelter and the power plant, which together employ approximately 660 people.

Approximately 1,170 employees at the rolling operations, which includes the casthouse, hot mill, cold mills, and coating and slitting lines, will become employees of Kaiser Aluminum once the transaction is complete.

The rolling mill produces approximately 310,000 metric tons of flat rolled aluminum annually for use in packaging, including food containers, aluminum cans, and bottles.

After closing, Alcoa expects annual approximate decreases in sales of $800 million, net income (pre- and after-tax) of $45 million to $55 million, and Adjusted EBITDA of $90 million to $100 million, based on last 12-month pricing through September 2020. Alcoa expects to spend approximately $100 million for site separation and transaction costs, with approximately half being spent in 2021 and the remainder in 2022 and 2023.

Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC acted as exclusive financial advisor to Alcoa for this transaction and Jones Day served as legal counsel.


Dodging Death: America’s Mission to Find and Destroy Syria’s Chemical Weapons

Joby Warrick argues in his new book Red Line the international effort to remove Syria’s chemical weapons was unprecedented and a story of multilateral success.

The Syrian regime attacked the town of Ghouta in southwestern Syria with sarin, a nerve agent, that killed hundreds of civilians on August 21, 2013. With that, Syrian president Bashar al-Assad crossed a red line set by President Barack Obama, accelerating an effort to eliminate Assad’s stockpile of chemical weapons.

Joby Warrick, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, recently discussed this historic undertaking to deprive Assad of the bulk of his nerve agents and production equipment. He joined Press the Button, a podcast from the Ploughshares Fund, to talk about his newest book Red Line: The Unraveling of Syria and America's Race to Destroy the Most Dangerous Arsenal in the World.

In his book, Warrick reflects on America’s mission to find and destroy Syria’s chemical weapons and keep them out of the hands of the Islamic State.

While the United States and others had already been working to respond to the limited use of chemical weapons before that moment, after the large attack in Ghouta, the United States was faced with a choice of whether to pursue military action. Interestingly, a Russian initiative paved the way for a diplomatic resolution instead. In September 2013, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 2118 that required Syria to destroy all chemical weapons until mid-2014. Warrick highlights that it was the first time in history that a stockpile was removed in the middle of a war.

In his book, he reconstructs the history of the Syrian chemical weapons program, as well as key decision points to avoid a catastrophic leakage of deadly nerve agents to Syrian combatants and terrorist groups. Warrick was struck by how close Al Nusra, an Al-Qaeda affiliate, or the Islamic State, came to gaining hold of Syria’s chemical weapons and material.

He further explained how challenging it was to remove the material. Syrian citizens had been risking their lives to bring evidence of the use of chemical agents to the outside world, according to Warrick. Further, “the Pentagon, the people who put together the plan to get the chemicals out and destroy them, they took part in what was for some of them, the most important mission of their lives and it happened in a flash in historical terms,” Warrick said.

Despite the success to remove some chemical weapons during the war, the Syrian regime preserved a part of its arsenal and conducted several more large-scale attacks, including those in Khan Shaykhun in April 2017 and Douma in April 2018. It has been challenging to find justice. Warrick argued that Assad “wasn't really held accountable. To this day he’s never had to admit to using chemical weapons against his own people. He always denies it. Russia supports them at the UN. Any action that's meaningful is always blocked by Russia.”

Warrick suggested that more needs to be done. “The evidence is continuing to mount, and one can envision a dayand it might not be this year or next, but somedaywhen Syria will be held accountable in some way before the world court or before the UN,” he said.

This delayed accountability is not new in international conflict. Warrick reminded the listeners of the Balkan conflict in the 1990s where it took twenty years until justice was served. “It’s important not to give up, not to think that, just because time has passed that it's not relevant anymore, but to keep pushing that boulder up the hill to hopefully one day see that Syrian victims have their moment of justice,” he said.

Despite all the challenges, Warrick succeeded in recapturing the story of the Syrian regime crossing the red line and subsequent international action. Removing thirteen hundred tons of the chemical weapons stockpile and manufacturing equipment is a story of an unprecedented international effort. Albeit imperfect—as Assad’s intentions weren’t changed and he used the chemical agents again—the diplomatic path and consequent removal of some of the weapons showed what multilateral success can look like.

The entire interview with Joby Warrick is available here on Press the Button.

Doreen Horschig is the current Roger L. Hale Fellow at the Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. She received her PhD in security studies from the University of Central Florida and studies nuclear policy, specifically public opinion and counter-proliferation, as well as norms of nuclear and chemical weapons. You can follow her on Twitter @doreen__h.


Watch the video: Spetsnaz Soviet Afghanistan war (May 2022).