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USS Springfield (CL-66)

USS Springfield (CL-66)


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USS Springfield (CL-66)

USS Springfield (CL-66) was commissioned as a Cleveland class light cruiser (CL-66) and fought in the Pacific during the Second World War. During her short combat career she was awarded two battle stars.

The Springfield was laid down in February 1943, launched on 9 March 1944 and commissioned on 9 September 1944. Training and shakedown cruises occupied her until the end of 1944.

On 23 January 1945 the Springfield joined Task Group 21.5. This group was escorting the USS Quincy (CA-71) as she carried President Roosevelt to Malta, from where he flew to Yalta in the Crimea for a conference with Churchill and Stalin. TG 21.5 accompanied the Quincy to a point 300 miles south of the Azores, where they handed the President over to a fresh escort group. The Springfield then headed west, making for the Panama Canal, and from there Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on 16 February 1945.

The Springfield joined the main fleet just outside Ulithi on 14 March 1945, and became part of Task Force 58, the fast carrier force. Her first combat operations were raids on Kyushu (18 March) and Honshu (19 March), where she provided part of the cruiser screen for the carriers. The next target was Okinawa. Once again the Springfield was part of the carrier screen during a series of air attacks that lasted from 23 March to 1 April. She also got to fire her main guns as part of a shore bombardment, attacking Minami Daito Shima on 27 and 28 March.

On 1 April 1945 the Americans invaded Okinawa. The carrier fleet remained in the area for the next two months, providing air support to the troops fighting on land. For most of that time the Springfield formed part of the defensive screen protecting TF 58's carriers against attack, mainly by kamikaze aircraft. During this period she claimed at least three victories, and narrowly avoided being hit herself, moving out of the way of a kamikaze with only missed by 50 yards (17 April).

Between 23 March and 28 May the Springfield was on station off Okinawa continuously, with only one break when the fleet moved to attack Japanese airfields on Kyushu on 13-14 May in an attempt to destroy the bases used by the kamikazes. While at Okinawa she was part of the anti-aircraft screen apart from two periods on 10 and 11 May when she repeated her short bombardment of Minami Daito Shima.

On 27 May 1945 Admiral Halsey took command of the fleet, which was thus redesignated as the Third Fleet (it was the Fifth Fleet when Admiral Spruance was in command). Just after this the Springfield moved to Leyte for a month of maintenance and repairs. She rejoined TF 38 in early July.

In July and the first half of August TF 38 repeatedly attacked targets on the Japanese Home Islands, including Tokyo, northern Honshu and Hokkaido. For most of this period the Springfield was part of the carrier screen, but she did take part in shore bombardments of southern Honshu on the night of 24-25 July.

After the Japanese surrender the Springfield, as part of TF 35, sailed into Sagami Bay (outside Tokyo Bay). On 30 August she covered the movement of TF 31 into Tokyo Bay, before moving into the bay herself on 3 September.

The Springfield remained in the Far East until January 1946, when she returned to San Pedro, California. She spent most of 1946 operating off the US west coast, before returning to the Pacific in November.

Over the next few years the Springfield operated in the western Pacific from late 1946 until March 1947 and again from November 1948 until June 1949. She then returned to the US, where in January 1950 she joined the San Francisco group of the Reserve Fleet.

For many Cleveland class cruisers the entry into the reserve marked the end of their career, but the Springfield was one of a group that was chosen for conversion into a Providence class Terrier guided missile cruiser. Work began in May 1959 and took until 2 July 1960 when she was re-commissioned as CLG-7.

In December 1960 the Springfield left Boston for the Mediterranean, where she became the flagship for the commander of the 6th Fleet. She spent the next six years serving with the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean (apart from a refit in Boston during 1963).

In January-February 1967 the Springfield returned to Boston for a six month long overhaul. She then became the flagship of the commander of the 2nd Fleet, based on the US east coast. She held that position until the summer of 1969, and again for a spell in 1970. In August 1970 she returned to the Mediterranean to serve as flagship of the 6th Fleet for a second time, this time spending four years in the Mediterranean.

On 1 September 1973 she was relieved by USS Little Rock and began a return trip to the United States. After her return she was decommissioned (15 May 1974) and she was sold off in 1978 after a career that had lasted for over thirty years, with half of them in active service.

Displacement (standard)

11,744t

Displacement (loaded)

14,131t

Top Speed

32.5kts

Range

11,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

3-5in

- armour deck

2in

- bulkheads

5in

- barbettes

6in

- turrets

6.5in face
3in top
3in side
1.5in rear

- conning tower

5in
2.25in roof

Length

610ft 1in oa

Armaments

Twelve 6in/47 guns (four triple turrets)
Twelve 5in/38 guns (six double positions)
Twenty four 40mm guns
Twenty one 20mm guns
Four aircraft

Crew complement

1,285

Builder

Bethlehem, Quincy

Laid down

13 February 1943

Launched

9 March 1944

Commissioned

9 September 1944

Sold for break up

1978


SPRINGFIELD CG 7

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Cleveland Class Light Cruiser
    Keel Laid 13 February 1943 - Launched 9 March 1944

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Springfield (CL-66, later CLG-7 & CG-7), 1944-1980

USS Springfield, a 10,000-ton Cleveland class light cruiser built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned in September 1944. She made her shakedown cruise along the U.S. East Coast and in the West Indies then, in late January 1945, helped to escort President Franklin D. Roosevelt part way on his voyage to the Yalta Conference. Shortly afterwards Springfield passed through the Panama Canal to join the Pacific Fleet. Arriving in the Western Pacific in mid-March, she served with Task Force 58 during air strikes against the Japanese home islands and during the Okinawa campaign. In May 1945 Springfield briefly left the carrier force to use her guns to bombard the island of Minami Daito. During the war's final month of raids against targets on Honshu and Hokkaido, the cruiser mainly served with the carriers, but also fired another bombardment and made anti-shipping sweeps.

Following Japan's surrender on 2 September 1945, Springfield continued to operate in the China-Korea-Japan area. She left the Far East in early January 1946 and served off the U.S. West Coast for nearly two years, with time out from November 1946 until March 1947 for a cruise through the Central Pacific. Springfield deployed again to Asiatic waters between October 1947 and May 1949. After inactivation preparations, in January 1950 she entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Francisco, California.

In March 1957, Springfield was towed to Quincy, Massachusetts, where she began conversion to a guided-missile cruiser. Redesignated CLG-7 in May 1957, she was recommissioned in July 1960 with her armament and appearance greatly altered. Late in the year the ship crossed the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea, where she began a lengthy tour as flagship of the Sixth Fleet. Between mid-1967 and mid-1970 Springfield operated in the Atlantic, generally as Second Fleet flagship. She visited Europe in September-October 1968 for a NATO exercise and several port calls. A final cruise as Sixth Fleet flagship commenced in August 1970 and lasted until September 1973. USS Springfield was decommissioned in mid-1974 and laid up at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Redesignated CG-7 in June 1975, she had no further active service and was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register at the end of July 1978. The ship was sold for scrapping in March 1980.


USS Springfield (CL-66, later CLG-7 & CG-7), 1944-1980

USS Springfield, a 10,000-ton Cleveland class light cruiser built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned in September 1944. She made her shakedown cruise along the U.S. East Coast and in the West Indies then, in late January 1945, helped to escort President Franklin D. Roosevelt part way on his voyage to the Yalta Conference. Shortly afterwards Springfield passed through the Panama Canal to join the Pacific Fleet. Arriving in the Western Pacific in mid-March, she served with Task Force 58 during air strikes against the Japanese home islands and during the Okinawa campaign. In May 1945 Springfield briefly left the carrier force to use her guns to bombard the island of Minami Daito. During the war's final month of raids against targets on Honshu and Hokkaido, the cruiser mainly served with the carriers, but also fired another bombardment and made anti-shipping sweeps.

Following Japan's surrender on 2 September 1945, Springfield continued to operate in the China-Korea-Japan area. She left the Far East in early January 1946 and served off the U.S. West Coast for nearly two years, with time out from November 1946 until March 1947 for a cruise through the Central Pacific. Springfield deployed again to Asiatic waters between October 1947 and May 1949. After inactivation preparations, in January 1950 she entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet at San Francisco, California.

In March 1957, Springfield was towed to Quincy, Massachusetts, where she began conversion to a guided-missile cruiser. Redesignated CLG-7 in May 1957, she was recommissioned in July 1960 with her armament and appearance greatly altered. Late in the year the ship crossed the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea, where she began a lengthy tour as flagship of the Sixth Fleet. Between mid-1967 and mid-1970 Springfield operated in the Atlantic, generally as Second Fleet flagship. She visited Europe in September-October 1968 for a NATO exercise and several port calls. A final cruise as Sixth Fleet flagship commenced in August 1970 and lasted until September 1973. USS Springfield was decommissioned in mid-1974 and laid up at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Redesignated CG-7 in June 1975, she had no further active service and was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register at the end of July 1978. The ship was sold for scrapping in March 1980.

On a day like today. 1700: Russia gives up its Black Sea fleet as part of a truce with the Ottoman Empire.

1758: British and Hanoverian armies defeat the French at Krefeld in Germany.

1760: Austrian forces defeat the Prussians at Landshut, Germany.

1776: The final draft of Declaration of Independence was submitted to US Congress.


1812: Marine Lt. John Heath became the first casualty of the War of 1812.


1861: The Confederate Navy began the reconstruction of the ex U.S.S. Merrimack as ironclad C.S.S. Virginia at Norfolk.

1863: Confederate forces overwhelm a Union garrison at the Battle of Brasher City in Louisiana.

1865: Confederate General Stand Watie surrenders his army at Fort Towson, in the Oklahoma Territory.

1884: A Chinese Army defeats the French at Bacle, Indochina.

1933: The Navy's last dirigible, the USS Macon, is commissioned.


USS Springfield (CL 66)

Decommissioned in January 1950.
Recomissioned as guided-missile cruiser on 2 July 1960.
Decommissioned 15 May 1974.
Stricken 30 September 1978.
Sold 11 March 1980 to be broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Springfield (CL 66)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Capt. Felix Leslie Johnson, USN9 Sep 194415 May 1945
2T/Capt. Thomas Joseph Kelly, USN15 May 194512 Mar 1946

You can help improve our commands section
Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.


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USS Springfield (CL-66) - History

This page features selected photographs taken on board USS Springfield (CLG-7).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Steams through a Mediterranean storm in early November 1960, while en route to Barcelona, Spain, from Villefranche, France.
According to the original photo caption, this was "one of the biggest storms to hit the Mediterranean area in the last two decades."
View looks forward from atop the ship's pilothouse.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 610 pixels

Vice Admiral David L. McDonald, USN , (left),
Commander Sixth Fleet

Discusses the fleet's recent activities with Admiral George W. Anderson, Jr., USN, Chief of Naval Operations, on board his flagship, USS Springfield (CLG-7), 1 June 1962.
The chart of the northwestern Mediterranean shows the location of many of the Sixth Fleet's ships.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 108KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-711075.

Line-handling crew stands by as a fast combat support ship (AOE) moves into position for replenishment at sea, September 1972.
Photographed by PH2 Harry Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 130KB 740 x 515 pixels

Crewmen prepare a line-throwing gun for replenishment at sea operations, September 1972.
Photographed by PH2 Harry Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 131KB 590 x 765 pixels

Crewmen handles a line, during underway replenishment operations in September 1972.
Photographed by PH2 Harry Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 131KB 590 x 765 pixels

Crewmen guides a net full of compressed gas bottles to the cruiser's deck, during underway replenishment operations in September 1972.
Photographed by PH2 Harry Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 137KB 740 x 535 pixels

Crewmen work to store supplies delivered by a helicopter from the combat store ship USS San Diego (AFS-6), during vertical replenishment operations in September 1972.
These boxes contain cans of "Kane's Country Style Wax Beans".
Photographed by PH2 Harry Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 107KB 545 x 765 pixels

A crewman is lowered to the cruiser's flight deck from a HH-2D "Seasprite" helicopter, during a personnel transfer practice session, 11 January 1973.
Photographed by PH2 Harry E. Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 49KB 460 x 765 pixels

Crash crewman stands ready for action as a helicopter prepares to land on the cruiser's deck, 11 January 1973.
Photographed by PH2 Harry E. Deffenbaugh, Jr.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 91KB 495 x 765 pixels

Flight deck crewman watch a practice session of personnel transfer by helicopter, 11 January 1973.
Photographed by PH2 Harry E. Deffenbaugh, Jr.


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Product Description

USS Springfield CL 66

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Springfield cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Entire Crew Roster
  • Route Chart during War with Dates and Purpose
  • Christening and Launching March - September 1944
  • Shakedown Cruise
  • Divisional Group Photos
  • Detailed War Log Mar 9 1944 - Jan 1946
  • History of the Springfield
  • Beach Party in Trinidad
  • Awards and Inspections
  • Philippine and Japan Action
  • Many Random Shipboard Photos

Over 210 Photos on 126 pages. 7 pages with written description telling the WWII story for this ship.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Light Cruiser during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Springfield during the World War II era (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    USS Springfield (CL-66) - History

    The Springfield (SSN 761), a Los Angeles-class attack submarine, is the fourth ship of the U.S. Navy to bear that name. She was specifically named for Springfield, Illinois, and Springfield, Massachusetts. The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on March 21, 1986, and her keel was laid down on January 29, 1990. She was christened and launched on January 4, 1992 sponsored by the Honorable Lynn Martin, and commissioned on January 9, 1993, with Cmdr. Richard K. Ford in command.

    August 12, 2003 The Springfiled moored outboard the USS Emory S. Land (AS 39) in La Maddalena, Sardinia, for a six-day Fleet Maintenance Availability (FMAV).

    October 19, SSN 761 pulled again into Naval Support Activity La Maddalena for a six-day upkeep.

    November 10, USS Springfield returned to Naval Submarine Base New London after a four-month deployment in the U.S. 6th Fleet AoR in support of the Global War on Terrorism. Since departed Groton, Conn., on July 15, she operated in conjunction with the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Carrier Strike Group, and visited Rota, Spain Aksaz, Turkey and Gibraltar.

    February 13, 2004 Cmdr. Peter Miller relieved Cmdr. Daniel P. Forney as commanding officer of the Springfield in a ceremony at the Shepherd of the Sea Chapel.

    Beginning in mid-2004, SSN 761 began an extensive overhaul and modernization period at Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Conn. In addition to normal periodic maintenance and repairs, the nuclear-powered sub received extensive modernization in fire control systems, sonar processing, weapons launch systems, and communications outfit, a ring laser gyro inertial navigation system, as well as stealth improvements and engine room upgrades. The overhaul was completed in Dec. 2005.

    March 29, 2007 USS Springfield returned to Groton, Conn., after a six-month deployment.

    As of May, the Springfield, commanded by Cmdr. Paul E. Savage, is in port for a routine upkeep and modernization period.

    September 12, 2008 USS Springfield departed Naval Submarine Base New London for a scheduled depolyment, as part of the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group.

    February 27, 2009 The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine pulled into Naval Station Rota, Spain, for a routine port call.

    March 12, USS Springfield returned to homeport after a six-month underway period. She made seven port calls, including the first by an SSN to Fujairah, U.A.E., and is also the first attack submarine to navigate the southern tip of Africa using full electronic navigation - Voyage Management System (VMS).

    August 25, The U.S Navy has awarded General Dynamics Electric Boat a $42 million contract to plan and perform routine maintenance and modernization work on USS Springfield. It is expected to be completed by February 2010.

    November 10, 2011 USS Springfield returned to Groton after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

    January 20, 2012 Cmdr. Christian B. Williams relieved Cmdr. Enrique N. Panlilio as CO of the SSN 761 during a change-of-command ceremony at the Naval Submarine Library and Museum in Groton.

    October 19, The Springfield arrived in Annapolis, Md., for a three-day port visit to U.S. Naval Academy in conjunction with the homecoming weekend.

    January 22, 2013 USS Springfield departed Naval Submarine Base New London for a surge Middle East deployment.

    February 4, SSN 761 recently moored at Toulon Naval Base, France, for a routine port call Underway on Feb. 8.

    April 1, The Springfield moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a week-long upkeep.

    June 3, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine arrived in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Teritory, for a routine port call.

    July 22, USS Springfield returned to homeport after a six-month deployment.

    From April 4-10, 2014, the Springfield participated in annual anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercise Fleet Challenge, in the Jacksonville Op. Area.

    July 18, Cmdr. Daniel J. Lombardo relieved Cmdr. Christian B. Williams as CO of the USS Springfield during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ex-USS Nautilus (SSN 571) at NSB New London. SSN 761 is currently at the floating dry-dock Shippingport (ARDM 4) for a Drydocking Continuous Maintenance Availability (D-CMAV).

    September 12, USS Springfield recently completed sea trials after a three-month availability.

    September 4, 2015 Capt. John E. McGunnigle, Jr., Commander, Submarine Squadron (SUBRON) 4 relieved of duty Cmdr. Daniel Lombardo due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." Capt. Jack Houdeshell, the deputy commander of SUBRON 4, assumed temporary command of the USS Springfield.

    November 4, The Springfield, commanded by Capt. Roger E. Meyer, returned to Naval Submarine Base New London after underway for routine training Brief stop off NSB New London on Nov. 30 Returned home on Dec. 18.?

    January ?, 2016 USS Springfield departed Groton for a scheduled deployment.

    March 10, SSN 761 moored at Haakonsvern Naval Base in Bergen, Norway, for a week-long port call Moored at Haakonsvern Naval Base again from April 11-1?.

    April 19, The Springfield moored at Her Majesty Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde in Faslane, Scotland, for a 12-day upkeep.

    May 6, USS Springfield moored at East NATO Fuel Pier in Portinho da Costa, Portugal, for a four-day liberty port visit to Lisbon Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on May 11.

    May 17, USS Springfield moored at Milhaud Pier 5E in Toulon Naval Base, France, for a four-day port visit Brief stop off Augusta Bay, Sicily, on May 24.

    May 31, The Los Angeles-Improved class attack submarine made a brief stop off Limassol, Cyprus, to resupply.

    June 27, The Springfield moored at Berth 2, Pier 1 on Naval Station Rota, Spain, for a routine port call.

    July 14, USS Springfield moored at Pier 10S on Naval Submarine Base New London following a six-month deployment to the U.S. 6th Fleet AoR.

    November 18, Cmdr. Brent C. Spillner relieved Capt. Roger E. Meyer as the 13th CO of Springfield, during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Submarine Base New London's Shepherd of the Sea chapel.

    December 1, SSN 761 arrived at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, for a scheduled Engineered Overhaul (EOH), after a two-day transit from Groton.

    November 26, 2018 USS Springfield undocked from Dry Dock #1 and moored pierside at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.

    May ?, 2019 USS Springfield moored at Pier 8S on Naval Submarine Base New London following a two-and-a-half year overhaul.

    August 19, The Springfield departed Portsmouth Naval Shipyard after completing a scheduled maintenance Moored at Pier 17S in Naval Submarine Base New London on Aug. 2?.

    September 22, USS Springfield departed Groton for a homeport change to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Transited the Panama Canal southbound on Oct. 4 Moored at Wharf S11 in Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, for the first time, on Oct. 21.

    October 23, Cmdr. John P. Nilles relieved Cmdr. Brent C. Spillner as CO of the Springfield during a change-of-command ceremony on board the sub.

    December 6, USS Springfield moored at Wharf S21A on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after a five-day underway in the Hawaiian Op. Area Underway again on Jan. 14 Brief stop in Pearl Harbor for personnel transfer on Jan. 15 and 17th Returned home on Jan. 21 Underway again on Feb. ?.

    March 15, The Springfield moored at Berth 6, Delta Pier on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, Wash., for a three-day port visit Brief stop off Dungeness Spit, in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, for personnel transfer on March 22.

    April 3, USS Springfield moored at Wharf S11 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Underway again on May 5 Brief stop in Pearl Harbor for personnel transfer on May 8 Moored at Wharf W5 for ammo onload on May 1? Moored at Wharf S21B on May 18 Emergency sortied due to Hurricane Douglas on July 23.

    August 1, The Springfield made a brief stop in Pearl Harbor for personnel transfer Moored at Wharf Y2 on Aug. ? Moored at Wharf W5, Naval Magazine Lualualei from Oct. 27-? Underway for a Dependent's Cruise on Nov. 14 At anchorage, approximately 4 n.m. south of Lahaina, Maui, from Nov. 15-16.

    February 12, 2021 USS Springfield departed Pearl Harbor for a scheduled western Pacific deployment and a homeport change to Apra Harbor, Guam.

    April 5, The Springfield moored at Berth 13S in Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, for a six-day port call.


    Watch the video: USS springfield (May 2022).